Consolidated PT-3

1st Flight 1927

Military Users- Cuban Air Force, Argentine Air Force, Brazilian Naval Aviation, Peruvian Air Force, Mexican Air Force, United States Army Air Corps, United States Navy, United States Marine Corps.

Consolidated PT-3

Seeing the success of the Navy’s NY-1 modification of a PT-1 airframe, the USAAC came to the conclusion that a radial engine was indeed ideal for a trainer.

It was reliable and offered a good power-to-weight ratio.

Consolidated PT-3

Therefore, one PT-1 airframe was completed as XPT-2 with a 220 hp (164 kW) Wright J-5 Whirlwind radial engine.

The XPT-3 was almost identical to the XPT-2 except for the tail, revised wing panels and different shape.

Consolidated PT-3

130 production PT-3 aircraft were ordered in September 1927, with one being completed as the XO-17.

These were followed by 120 PT-3A aircraft with minor changes.

Consolidated PT-3

The XPT-3 became the XPT-5 when fitted with the Curtiss Challenger R-600 two-row six-cylinder radial engine, but was soon converted to PT-3 standard.

The PT-3 aircraft were superseded by the Boeing PT-13 Stearman starting in 1937, a number were still operational with the Spartan Flying School in Tulsa Oklahoma into the middle of World War II.

Consolidated PT-3

Variants-

XPT-2, XPT-3, PT-3, PT-3A, XPT-4, XPT-5.

Consolidated PT-3

Specifications-

Crew: two

Length: 28 ft 1 in (8.56 m)

Wingspan: 34 ft 6 in (10.52 m)

Consolidated PT-3

Height: 10 ft 3 in (3.12 m)

Wing area: 300 ft2 (27.87 m2)

Empty weight: 1,785 lb (810 kg)

Max, take off weight: 2,481 lb (1,125 kg)

Power plant: 1 × Wright R-790-AB radial, 220 hp (164 kW)

Consolidated PT-3

Performance

Maximum speed: 102 mph (164 km/h)

Cruise speed: 81 mph (130 km/h)

Range: 300 miles (483 km)

Service ceiling: 14,000 ft (4,267 m)

Rate of climb: 658 ft/min (200 m/min)

Consolidated PT-3

Credits-

Reuben Fleet and the story of Consolidated Aircraft-William Wagner.

Consolidated Aircraft Corporation-Katrina Pescador, Mark Aldrich.

The Complete book of fighters-William Green, Gordon Swanborough.

Wikipedia

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