Vultee V-11 & V-12

1st Flight 1935

The Vultee V-11 and V-12 were American stressed-skin monocoque monoplane attack aircraft of the 1930s.

Developed from the Vultee V-1 single-engine airliner, the V-11 and V-12 were purchased by several nations for their armed forces, including China, who used them in combat against Japanese forces in the Second Sino-Japanese War.

The United States Army Air Corps purchased seven V-11s as the YA-19 in the years before World War II, testing them to gather data to compare against twin engine light attack aircraft.

Variants

V-11

First prototype fitted with 750 hp (560 kW) Wright SR-1820-F53 Cyclone driving a two-bladed Hamilton Standard controllable-pitch propeller, which crashed killing both pilot and the project engineer.

V-11-A

Second prototype, similar to first V-11, but with a three-bladed constant speed propeller.

V-11-G

Initial production two-seat light bomber. Powered by an 850 hp (630 kW) Wright R-1820-G2 Cyclone engine. 30 built for China.

V-11-GB

Three-seat version of V-11. 4 aircraft purchased by Soviet Union (2 as pattern aircraft), 40 by Turkey and others.

V-11-GB2

26 purchased by Brazil – generally similar to V-11-GB

V11-GB2F

Final example for Brazil fitted with floats, however it wasn’t accepted.

V-11-GBT

redesignation of V-11-GB for Turkey

V-12

Revised version of three-seat bomber with refined aerodynamics and more power. One prototype flew in 1939 powered by Pratt & Whitney R-1830 Twin Wasp engine.

V-12-C

Production version of V-12 for China. Powered by R1820-G105B Cyclone engine. 26 built, one by Vultee and remaining 25 assembled in China.

V-12-D

Revised version with new fuselage and powered by 1,600 hp (1,200 kW) Wright R-2600 Cyclone 14 engine. 52 ordered for China, two pattern aircraft built by Vultee and 50 for local assembly.

V-52

Unbuilt observation design based on YA-19.

USAAC Designations

YA-19

Variant of V-11-GB for United states Army Air Corps. Seven examples built.

YA-19A

The last YA-19 was redesignated and completed as an engine test bed. Equipped with enlarged vertical stabilizer (for improve directional stability) and powered by Lycoming O-1230 (12-cylinder opposed) engine.

YA-19B

The second YA-19 built was redesignated after being fitted with a Pratt & Whitney R-2800 radial engine as an engine test bed.

YA-19C

The YA-19A was redesignated after being fitted with a Pratt & Whitney Twin Wasp R-1830-51 engine. Performance was similar to the YA-19.

A-19

The remaining five YA-19s were redesignated A-19 after assignment to active duty.

Soviet Designations

BSh-1

Soviet licensed armoured ground attack version. Powered by 920 hp (690 kW) M-62. Production stopped after at least 31 built.

PS-43

Designation for BSh-1 when used by Aeroflot as light transport.

Specifications

XA-19

Crew: Three (pilot, observer/gunner and bombardier/photographer)

Length: 37 ft 10 in (11.53 m)

Wingspan: 50 ft 0 in (15.24 m)

Height: 10 ft 0 in (3.05 m)

Wing area: 384 sq ft (35.7 m2)

Airfoil: Clark Y

Empty weight: 6,452 lb (2,927 kg)

Gross weight: 10,420 lb (4,726 kg)

Max take-off weight: 16,285 lb (7,387 kg)

Fuel capacity: 311-330 gallons

Powerplant: 1 × Pratt & Whitney R-1830-17 Twin Wasp 14-cylinder two-row air-cooled radial engine, 1,200 hp (890 kW)

Propellers: 3-bladed Hamilton Standard variable-pitch propeller

Performance

Maximum speed: 230 mph (370 km/h, 200 kn) at 6,500 ft (2,000 m)

Cruise speed: 207 mph (333 km/h, 180 kn)

Minimum control speed: 80 mph (130 km/h, 70 kn)

Range: 1,110 mi (1,790 km, 960 nmi) with 1,080 lb (490 kg) of bombs

Ferry range: 1,350 mi (2,170 km, 1,170 nmi)

Service ceiling: 20,500 ft (6,200 m)

Rate of climb: 1,320 ft/min (6.7 m/s)

Armament

Guns:

4 x forward-firing .30 in (7.62 mm) machine guns in wings

1 x dorsal .30 in (7.62 mm) machine gun

1 x ventral .30 in (7.62 mm) machine gun

Bombs: 6 x 30 lb (14 kg) in cells semi-recessed in wing centre section and 1,100 lb (500 kg) externally.

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