Boulton Paul Balliol

1st Flight 1947

The Boulton Paul Balliol and Sea Balliol were monoplane advanced trainer aircraft.

On 17 May 1948, it became the world’s first single-engine turboprop aircraft to fly.

The Balliol was operated primarily by both the Royal Air Force (RAF) and the Royal Navy Fleet Air Arm (FAA).

Variants

P.108 Balliol T.Mk 1

Prototypes, three built.

Powered by the Armstrong Siddeley Mamba turboprop engine.

Balliol T.Mk 2

Two-seat advanced training aircraft for the RAF.

Sea Balliol T.Mk 21

Two-seat advanced training aircraft for the FAA.

Specifications

Crew

2

Length

35 ft 1+1⁄2 in (10.71 m)

Wingspan

39 ft 4 in (11.99 m)

Height

12 ft 6 in (3.81 m)

Wing area

250 sq ft (23 m2)

Airfoil

NACA 65

Empty weight

6,730 lb (3,053 kg)

Gross weight

8,410 lb (3,815 kg)

Fuel capacity

125 imp gal (150 US gal; 570 L)

Powerplant

1 × Rolls-Royce Merlin 35 liquid-cooled V12 engine, 1,245 hp (928 kW)

Propellers

4-bladed de Havilland constant speed propeller, 11 ft 3 in (3.43 m) diameter

Performance

Maximum speed

288 mph (463 km/h, 250 kn) at 9,000 ft (2,700 m)

Cruise speed

231 mph (372 km/h, 201 kn) at 5,500 ft (1,700 m) (weak mix)

Stall speed

83 mph (134 km/h, 72 kn)

Endurance

Three hours at 220 mph (190 kn; 350 km/h)

Service ceiling

32,500 ft (9,900 m)

Rate of climb

1,790 ft/min (9.1 m/s)

Time to altitude

Six minutes to 10,000 ft (3,000 m)

Take-off distance to 50 ft (15 m)

1,350 ft (410 m)

Landing distance from 50 ft (15 m)

1,950 ft (590 m)

Armament

Guns

One × 0.303 in (7.7 mm) Browning machine gun in port wing

Rockets

Provision for four × “60-lb” rockets.

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